Personal Training Series: Coaching your way to a healthy lifestyle

Health is an area in many people’s lives which is neglected. To live a healthy life requires taking action, as with other areas of your life, to get results. There is a wealth of information from professionals and websites offering the know-how to live a healthy life. So why are we not all healthy?

I have found – as with other areas of my life – that you need coaches. Coaches not only motivate you and keep you on track; they also provide you with the most recent information about living a healthy lifestyle. A coach can put a plan in place which is easy to follow, adaptable to your lifestyle, and is measurable over time.

In today’s world, you can approach many different types of professionals to get this help, but I have found that it works best if just one person takes overriding responsibility for you achieving your results. Generally the coach who can help you is the one who lives the life they teach. In health there is a holistic approach and there is a Western medical approach, and I think a combination of the two is needed. The areas that may be included in assessment of your health are: your medical history; your lifestyle habits; your physical training habits; and your mental approach.

I am a physiotherapist and I work closely with personal trainers developing healthy lifestyles for clients. I am able to draw on the help of medical professionals, such as doctors and surgeons, and also holistic professionals, such as Pilates instructors, homeopaths and counsellors. Personal trainers have a wealth of skills which they can use with their clients including lifestyle coaching, physical training, nutrition and exercise goal setting.

This series of blogs is designed to give my perspective, as a physiotherapist and someone who lives a healthy lifestyle, on how you can avoid injury when working with a trainer. The blogs are separated into common scenarios I see as a physiotherapist in my clinic. The aim is to assess those clients we see and to learn more about injury prevention when working with a personal trainer.

In the following weeks there will be 20 blogs which will give a comprehensive outline of how you can work best with a personal trainer and a physiotherapist. Please call or contact us via email with any questions you may have about these blogs.

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Ironman and Author Rhys Chong is interviewed by The Running Bug and talks about working with a professional Team to achieve his goals

Author, Physiotherapist and Ironman, Rhys Chong describes how he completed an ironman using his own team of professionals. Whether it’s 5k or an ironman you can boost your chances of success by training like an elite.

ironmanWinning a Gold Medal at the Olympics, winning the Tour de France or winning an Ironman are spared for the elite athletes of the world. Every sport has its unique demands, but there is one goal all athletes strive for … to be the “best he/she can be”.

Whether you are a professional or an amateur, there are aspects of trainingwhich can help you be the “best you can be”. The key is to have a team of specialists who work specifically for you. Bradley Wiggins, Chrissie Wellington, and Sir Chris Hoy all have a team of professionals guiding them to success.

I completed my Ironman and had a team of professionals working with me. I knew if I wanted to be the “best I could be” I would need coaches for different parts of my training. In my team there was a training coach, swim coach, bike mechanic,nutritionistmental conditioning coach, massage therapist, physiotherapist, and pilates instructor.

Each member of my coaching team had their role to play at various stages in my year of preparation for the Ironman. My training coach directed the overall training plan and as my strength and technique improved, with the help of other specialists, I focussed on work with my mental conditioning coach. I did have injuries during the year but they were minor. It helped to condition my body with gym work and pilates. The expert physiotherapy treatment and massage therapy I received allowed me to train six days a week.

Elite athletes will train in cycles of four years in preparation for the Olympics. The focus of their team is to have them at peak performance for that one race, on that one day that really counts. This could be your “A” race for the year when you want to set a PB (Personal Best).

My advice is to plan your training with your coaches. Your entire physical and mental preparation will be for your “A” race. The synergy created by pinpoint focus on your “A” race will create incredible results.

There are multiple benefits to having a team of coaches. Your coaches are with you from the beginning of your journey through to crossing the finish line. They know how you “tick”, and can provide you with emotional guidance and motivation, in the good times and the bad. Your training can be adapted to fit with what is happening in your life. When it really matters, we all want to talk to people and training is no different.

 

Tri Coaches to try:

www.physical-edge.com.

Learning to run on the Forefoot at Vivobarefoot running clinic

 Physical Edge attends Barefoot (Forefoot)  running Lab with Rollo from Vivobarefoot. This was a 6 hour Lab looking at the current biomechanics supporting Forefoot running and then how to run on the Forefoot itself.  The Laboratory is based in Farringdon, London and it contains the latest technology for gait analysis, including video analysis and force plate measurements. 
 
The training demonstrated the importance of correcting restrictions in the foot before starting Forefoot running. These restrictions can alter the flexibility of the first toe, Metatarsal and ankle. When running it was a key concept to feel pressure exerted through the knuckle of the first toe. This was called the Line of Leverage and shifted the Centre of Mass forward onto the Forefoot. The body is designed to take pressure through this Line of Leverage to help propel the body forward in running.
 
The way we walk, run and sprint require different biomechanics. If the body adopts the old paradigm of running, heel- to toe, it is constantly exposed to decelerating forces and subsequent injuries. Common areas for injury can be the ankle, knee, hip and low back. Primary areas to keep flexible to enable efficient Forefoot running are the Thoracic spine, hip and ankle. 
 
The day was an insight into the development of shoes designed to assist in Forefoot running. These shoes have very thin soles to replicate skin and assist in creating the sensation of running Barefoot. Forefoot running in the shoes is comfortable. In winter they can get cold but you can buy socks to keep your feet warm.
 
Physical Edge noticed when running Forefoot for the first time the calf muscles and soles of the feet can get very stiff and sore the next day. This is an adaption process and a reason why training is done gradually. If you have an injury you can learn to run Forefoot but it will require a period of rest from training. You can do alternative cardiovascular exercises like swimming, water running and possible cycling. 
 
Physical Edge can you help you prepare your body for Forefoot running and direct you to trained Forefoot running coaches. If you have any questions do call or email us and we look forward talking to you soon.

Newtotri: Introduction and making the decision start triathlon

ticles

 

Plan

 

  1. making the decision
  2. First steps to take
  3. What to expect with training
  4. Swim
  5. Bike
  6. Run

 

 

Introducing Rhys Chong and making the decision to enter your first triathlon

 

My name is Rhys, I am a physiotherapist  based in London and completed my first  Ironman in Switzerland last year. I have been asked by Newtotri to write weekly articles to help all of you who might want to do your first triathlon or are regularly enjoying this incredibly exciting sport.

 

I trained for one year to complete my Ironman.  When I started training I wanted learn the sport fast as there was no time to waste.  I managed to find several coaches to help me. These coaches included Ironman experts covering the areas of training, swimming, nutrition, mental preparation, bike mechanics, massage, and pilates.  I was able to take care of my injuries as a physiotherapist.

 

These coaches directed me in all aspects of Ironman training and saved me hours of work looking for information on places to train, equipment to buy and events to enter. I owed the success and enjoyment of my Ironman to these coaches.

 

I would like to share with you what I have learnt from these coaches and in my training. I hope I can enhance your triathlon training and race experience.

 

If you have never done a triathlon and are thinking about starting you might have loads of questions you want answered. It helps to read magazines, books and websites like Newtotri.. It also helps to talk to coaches because they can adapt their advice to your specific circumstances. There are many coaches in each discipline of triathlon. It is important to find coaches you enjoy talking to and trust. The best test is to meet them in person and then make sure their coaching is clear and easy to understand.

 

It makes a big difference to have coaches who have done what you want to do. The coaches will then appreciate what you will be going through and can offer practical solutions to help you.  If you do not connect with a coach find another one.

 

When I was making a decision to start in triathlon the greatest fear I had was the fear of the unknown.  These fears raised questions such as Could I do it? Was I able to fit it into my life? Who would help me? and where do I get the information I need? I spoke to lots of people but ultimately the decision was a step into the unknown. When you take the first step it is amazing how the rest will fall into place.  My advice is just get started, enter a race and take small steps in your training.

 

Training is a very personal experience. Every triathlete will find what works best for his or her body. Remember you get better the more you train and race and give yourself the time to learn. Making mistakes will happen but correcting these mistakes is when you learn the most.

 

Training with a triathlon club can introduce you to other triathletes and resources. I personally found working with coaches on a one on one basis and then training myself was better. Training in a group intruded on my own training outcomes. In a club the speed, distance and times of training were predetermined. I wanted to train when I had the time and at the speeds and distances suiting my training plan.  In a triathlon race you will be racing alone so it is better to train alone to get used to it.

 

Training alone has other advantages. I became more aware of my body and my equipment. I noticed my heart rate rise rapidly when I exercised hard and I was aware of how fast I recovered. I was more intune with my body’s reaction during training and as I learnt more I could adjust my race plan during the race depending on how I felt. This is very important in triathlon as you will be racing in three different sports one after the other and do not want to “hit the wall” and end your race prematurely.

 

In this article I have shared with you the benefits of having coaches to help you,  told you to enter your first triathlon even if you still have questions, and highlighted the benefit of training alone to  keep to your personal training goals.

 

You can find out more about my Triathlon Coaching Team on www.physical-edge.com Feel free to contact Physical Edge with your questions and read my blog on one year of Ironman training from my website.  Until next time, remember to stay focused and enjoy your new sport. You are now an athlete in currently the fastest growing Olympic sport in the world.