Physical Edge attends Jenny McConnell Course in Tunbridge Wells

Physical Edge sent Rhys Chong to Tunbridge Wells, to attend the Jenny McConnell  2013 edition of gait analysis and lower limb course. Jenny is a world leader in the treatment of knee pain and based in Sydney, Australia (www.mcconnell-institute.com).

Jenny McConnell believes in the KISS principle. She has identified common gait analysis issues over many years of practice,  and can provide evidence from scientific research to support her ideologies. She keeps the work her clients do at home to 5mins per day and knows “little and often” is the key to success. In her practice in Sydney, she works on a managing pain over a clients life time. It is like having an MOT for your car. She has MOT’s for the body and prevents pain before it happens.

The course looked at how the entire body compensates for dysfunction in the movement system. The hips are an area which is not treated well, and it was highlighted on the course. The course looked at the role of orthotics and shoes in supporting the body. McConnell has a new orthotic for high heeled shoes and sandles, a much needed invention (right ladies).

Physical Edge will be introducing orthotic prescription as an addition to its services. There will be MOT sessions to help people manage pain over their lifetime.  Physical Edge hopes to build strong relationships with clients, by learning over the long term how to help clients live healthy and painfree lives.

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Maximising performance in the off season

In professional sport the ‘off season’ offers an athlete the opportunity to rest, recover and mentally prepare for the following season. In the off season an athlete will do strength training and fitness training so that they are in peak condition when the new season starts. In tennis the fitness and strengthening will carry them through the season, and allows them to focus more on match play and technique.

In the amateur we can see that the off season either never occurs, or that the athlete decides to increase the intensity of their training – and injuries occur. The off season needs to be structured to maximise the benefits for the following season.

The off season also offers an opportunity for injuries to be treated sensibly and for the body to be rested to allow natural healing processes to occur. The powers of rest cannot be underestimated. This will include having plenty of sleep; it will also include having ‘active recovery’ whereby the body continues to exercise, but in a much lower intensity so that injuries can respond to treatment and heal.

Structure your year to peak for your events and also to have an off season. Your physiotherapist and trainer can work closely together to design an off season which will help heal your injuries and also maximise your potential for the following season OR for achieving an extra goal.

Personal Training Series: Ignoring pain

The human body has a pain sensing system. This system is designed to preserve the body and prevent long term damage. In training the body responds to stimuli and training pain needs to be overcome. However, there is a limit, and it is important to understand for your own body what that limit is.

I saw a documentary on television where a young boy had no pain sensing system. He would go to school and ask his friends to punch him in the stomach; he pretended he was superman because he felt no pain. One day his parents noticed bruising and swelling around his legs and abdomen, and took him to hospital. The doctors discovered he had severe internal haemorrhaging from being punched too much. This young boy’s lack of a pain sensing system could have led to his death.

Another documentary showed scientists trying to reproduce the pain sensing system in the body because it is so important for preserving life. With all the technology and advances in science today they were unable to replicate the system. It is highly complex and adapts to its changing environment. We need it to learn what not to do, what we can do, and what is dangerous.

In training, if we ignore pain completely then injuries often occur. It is important to put in perspective what you are doing, the experience you’ve had in training, and what you think your body can do – you must have realistic limitations as to how much pain you will withstand.

Be sensible and listen to your body. Focus on gradual increase in loading in training, and be happy with steady progress in your training goals. Aim long term rather than short term. Keep in touch with your physiotherapist and trainer to guide you through this process and avoid injury.

It is not much fun being injured and in the long run ignoring pain from an injury will make your training time longer. Get your body assessed by a physiotherapist and work with a personal trainer to prevent injury and to enjoy your training.

Personal Training Series: Pitfalls of leaving injuries too long

In physiotherapy I see many sports injuries. Often I will see injuries which have been present for several weeks, months or even years. Clients tell me they were never told by their doctors or specialists to see a physiotherapist and that they decided to leave time for the injury to heal by itself. By the time they come to physiotherapy the injuries have set in to the body; the central nervous system has adapted to the pain and now can prolong pain. The musculoskeletal system  has weakened or become tight, or moves incorrectly.

If you get injured call your physiotherapist to get advice straight away. Why wait? If you can’t see the physiotherapist, the physiotherapist can advise you over the phone what to do for your acute injury. It is in the phase just after inflammation that training can be very effective. Training in this time allows the body to adapt to load in a positive manner. The body becomes stronger, stiffer and moves correctly.

Starting treatment when an injury has been present for weeks, months or years will take longer. The amount of input the client has to put in outside of the physiotherapy clinic is also increased. What you are trying to do is to tell the body a new way of moving and being, and it takes time for the body to adapt to this new stimulus. The stimulus has to be applied frequently and regularly. Sometimes 100% resolution of the injury is unrealistic; in some cases it is more realistic to teach a person how to manage their pain rather than cure the pain completely.

It is obvious that it is important to treat acute injuries immediately and to seek medical care. Being proactive at the start avoids a tedious recovery time, which is likely to be the case if treatment is sought much later.

Once the physiotherapist has seen you through the acute phase of your injury, he can work with a personal trainer to design a training programme which is appropriate for your goals. The exercises given to you may have to be adapted for the injury, and these can be changed as the injury heals. Having a personal trainer watch you during the training process ensures that you do not do anything wrong, and risk reinjuring the body part.

The physiotherapist will know when your body is ready to train at full intensity again. The close relationship between the trainer and the physiotherapist is beneficial because the professionals know each other, talk the same language and can progress you through your training at the appropriate times. If you have physiotherapy questions, do contact us as http://www.physical-edge.com.

Personal Training Series: Putting the patient at risk

A patient came to me from training one on one with a trainer. She’d achieved many of her training goals in the gym, and therefore decided she wanted a new challenge. She asked the trainer to set a new challenge; and so the trainer decided to make her an Olympic weight lifter. This client was 5 foot tall, of medium build, and had never done heavy weight training before. The trainer gave her a deadlift to do, and in the process she felt a sudden sharp pain in her lower back and dropped the weights. She was in agony, could not sleep and noticed the pain whenever she was sitting for prolonged periods of time. On assessment she had significantly damaged ligaments around her sacro-iliac joint and it was now hypermobile. The treatment for this condition required regular physiotherapy, Pilates, and a modification of her training.

The above story is an example of an inexperienced trainer pushing the client beyond what should be expected of him / her (in this case a 5 foot tall medium built woman). The client has stopped going to that trainer and now requires more low level exercise training, rather than high level training such as running and weight training – which is what she originally desired.

When a physiotherapist and a trainer work closely together this situation can be avoided. The physiotherapist and trainer will assess whether an exercise programme is appropriate to give to the client, then find an alternative training method or set a different and more realistic goal if necessary. The client benefits from avoiding injury, continuing training, and having constant surveillance of how his / her progress is going. This is an example of why a physiotherapist and a personal trainer working together with a client makes a great team.

Personal Training series: Physical Edge Physiotherapy team working specifically with Personal Trainers for superior results

I believe being healthy is important, as it affects every area of life – if you are healthy you can do more and feel better doing it. Often people find it difficult to motivate themselves to go to the gym or to do sport; they need someone to direct them in their training, give them focussed goals, and keep them motivated along the way. Personal trainers play a significant role in this regard – helping people achieve their physical goals. Today personal trainers often work in one-on-one training facilities, to offer functional gym training in a smaller more intimate environment;the gym generally has better equipment, is cleaner and the trainers can offer state of the art functional training.

Having spoken with several high profile trainers in London, we have identified the need for physiotherapists to work with trainers.People find it frustrating when they get injuries and the trainer sends them to a physiotherapist they do not know; the physiotherapist may not clearly communicate back to the trainer what the client’s injury is, and how to help heal that injury during training. Sometimes training is stopped for no reason and the client is taken away from his / her training goals.

The way to improve the training process is to have a physiotherapist work with the trainer from the very start. By getting assessed by a physiotherapist before training starts, a person can discuss their injuries and how their body operates with a medical professional. The physiotherapist will identify the injuries, past and present, which may present during training sessions; even if there are no current injuries, the physiotherapist can identify potential pitfalls a person may encounter as they go through their training regime towards their goals. Once the person is assessed by the physiotherapist the physio can feed back to the personal trainer what to look out for during the training process, what limitations there are for that person in training, and whether the training goal is appropriate. The trainer can then confidently train a client knowing that he/she is supported by a medical professional who understands injuries and how the body functions in response to them.

The personal trainer will continue to communicate closely with the physiotherapist during the training process; the physiotherapist will continue in their assessment of a client throughout their training regime in order to maintain correct movement of the body and further direct the trainer towards more advanced training goals. By working well together in this way the physiotherapist and trainer help to provide a better service to their clients. If an injury does occur during training the physiotherapist will already know the client, and the trainer will be able to communicate immediately with the physio on how to proceed. The synergy of this relationship far exceeds any personal training system by itself.

The benefits to the client are:

  • Prevention of injuries during training
  • Faster goal attainment
  • Faster return to training if an injury does occur.

If you are interested in working with a physiotherapist and personal trainer contact us at http://www.physical –edge.com

The ‘Integrated Approach to Functional Change’ Physiotherapy Course

I completed my final weekend of the “Integrated Approach for Facilitating Change” course. This was run over 15 days over a 9 month period and brought together the previous training on treating and assessing the low back, neck and shoulder.  The final 4 days of training focussed on an entire approach of assessing injuries and included the  lower limb.
This approach identified the cause of the problem and got rapid results with fast effective techniques. I was able to see clearly how the foot should function in gait and how  ideal movement and alignment of joints can relieve pain. Functional rehabilitation was a key component in relieving pain and preventing pain from returning.
After the weekend I treated a man with hamstring pain. I assessed his rib cage and identified a problem. With correction of this problem he could touch his toes, sit and flex forward and straighten his knee and replicate kicking a rugby ball with no hamstring pain. He has had a second treatment and he is about to start cycling again.
I treated a triathlete with pain in his shoulder from catching his daughter in a swimming pool. He could not ride in profile position because pain extended down his arm and became too intense. I treated his rib cage and taught him how to suspend his body and he could ride with no pain after 1 session.
These are two of the changes I have made with effective long term results. I plan to specialise in treating Ironman athletes. These athletes need fast relief of pain and also to continue training.  My skills enable me to treat all other areas of body. To be truly effective the patient must comply with instructions and complete the treatment.
If you are interested in what I do contact me on mail@physical-edge.com