Making common sense training goals

Many of us like to set goals which will push us to our limits.  If we want to learn something well, we usually have a teacher or a coach, and this applies to physical training as well.

If you set a goal and along the way you get injured, or you can see that your sport is unsafe because your body cannot cope with the loads exerted on it, then have the common sense to change. The ability to listen to your body can prevent acute and long -term injuries. It is not worth training for weeks or months, to get injured and see your goals slip away.

A physiotherapist and trainer can help you make common sense decisions about your training goals. Both clinicians will listen to what you want to achieve, and assess your body, to decide whether or not your goals are realistic. Choosing the appropriate training goals will make training safe and achievable.

The body is not a machine, it responds to physical stimulus and will adapt over time. Setting goals which are small, on which you can build towards a much bigger goal, is the best way to train. A physiotherapist has knowledge in the areas of pathology, physiology and neurophysiology. A trainer knows how to train to achieve physical goals. Working with a Physiotherapist and Trainer gives you the professional support to choose the training program to best suit your needs.

Make a common sense decision now, before you waste time and money, and suffer injuries. Consult your physiotherapist and trainer as they work with you as you achieve your training goals.

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Personal Training Series: “Don’t care, get over the finish line”, can lead to injury

Some athletes are bloody minded and will do anything to win. Some clients only see the goal at the end but don’t think about the process of getting there. In physiotherapy I see many people who have trained incorrectly because they focus only on the event they are racing and not on how to train to get there.

Having a personal trainer and a physiotherapist work with you can vastly improve your chances of reaching your goal, with minimal to no injuries. The training process can be designed specifically for the goal and the exercises required to achieve the goal can be taught correctly.

When designing a training programme there are many variables to consider such as: exercise technique, timing of training, intensity of training, the environment of training, progressions of training, and even what is happening in an individual’s life. Having a team to work with you takes away the need to think. The professionals also have the experience and the knowledge to give you the best training advice.

When working with a physiotherapist and trainer you can contact them at any time. They can talk to you when you get injured, when you have questions about your training, and when you want to know what to do if you get injured. Having this team is like being a professional athlete, and provides the greatest chance of success.

I have seen amateur athletes start training, and progress doing extremely well without any help; then they reach a certain mileage in training and their body starts to break down.  At this point it is too late to change technique and training regime because the race is within a few weeks. Treatment is then about first aid care – doing everything possible to keep that person training despite the risk of increased injury, and the fact that the race is now in jeopardy. There are many emotions which accompany being in a position of unknown at race time. A person with injuries does not know how the body will react during the race; the target or goals in that race no longer apply; and all those weeks / months of training have been put at risk. To cross the finish line is often the goal after an injury has occurred. A plan then needs to be made to race the following year with correct training principles, guided by the personal trainer and physiotherapist.

It helps to get the right advice to train. Speak to your physiotherapist – who works closely with a personal trainer – to create a winning team.

Personal Training Series: Putting the patient at risk

A patient came to me from training one on one with a trainer. She’d achieved many of her training goals in the gym, and therefore decided she wanted a new challenge. She asked the trainer to set a new challenge; and so the trainer decided to make her an Olympic weight lifter. This client was 5 foot tall, of medium build, and had never done heavy weight training before. The trainer gave her a deadlift to do, and in the process she felt a sudden sharp pain in her lower back and dropped the weights. She was in agony, could not sleep and noticed the pain whenever she was sitting for prolonged periods of time. On assessment she had significantly damaged ligaments around her sacro-iliac joint and it was now hypermobile. The treatment for this condition required regular physiotherapy, Pilates, and a modification of her training.

The above story is an example of an inexperienced trainer pushing the client beyond what should be expected of him / her (in this case a 5 foot tall medium built woman). The client has stopped going to that trainer and now requires more low level exercise training, rather than high level training such as running and weight training – which is what she originally desired.

When a physiotherapist and a trainer work closely together this situation can be avoided. The physiotherapist and trainer will assess whether an exercise programme is appropriate to give to the client, then find an alternative training method or set a different and more realistic goal if necessary. The client benefits from avoiding injury, continuing training, and having constant surveillance of how his / her progress is going. This is an example of why a physiotherapist and a personal trainer working together with a client makes a great team.

Personal Training series: Setting goals too high

The danger of training can often be setting goals too high. It is very easy to decide that training with a trainer is the start of a whole new change of life. In some ways it is, but in other ways the goals that are set with the trainer need to be realistic for your body type and athletic ability. Of course, you can gradually build up to bigger and bigger goals, but at the start it helps to set achievable goals and test how your body adapts.

I have noticed that when clients come in with an injury they may suddenly decide to compete or race, where before the injury they had no desire to train. There is something about getting treatment or starting training which triggers within people a desire immediately to take part in races. I have had clients who injure their knees and yet suddenly want to do a marathon; this is a great example of setting goals which at the time are unrealistic. A more appropriate strategy may be to recover from the injury, build up strength, start looking at running technique, and slowly build the distance you run eg 10km, 15km, 21km and then a marathon.

I had another client who wanted to run a half marathon 3 months after giving birth; she reported pain in her body and required treatment which stopped her from training. 9 months down the track she completed the half marathon, and retrospectively acknowledged that she initially started training too early; she now knows  that her body needed the time to heal from the birth of her child before it was ready to withstand the impact of running and training. Her half marathon was a great success; she enjoyed the day and did not get injured. If you are going to do a half marathon for the first time, you want it to be an enjoyable experience. If she had done the race 3 months after giving birth, it would have been a painful experience and probably put her off running forever.

Having a physiotherapist and trainer work together can help you assess the current state of your body, and then help you set a plan to develop your strength, endurance and power. They can also look at your technique before helping you to set an appropriate goal. Having a trainer is hugely beneficial in overseeing your progression, and the physiotherapist can see how your body is improving and give you guidance as to how quickly training can progress. The physiotherapist also has the advantage of understanding medical conditions and the impact this will have on training.

Working progressively towards a goal often requires a change in a client’s mind-set. Patience is not everyone’s natural tendency; however if someone wants to achieve a goal there will be an element of patience required. If the goal is inappropriate – since the client does not want to wait to go through the training process – then a new goal needs to be set. At the end of the day the client will fail if the goal is set too high, and this reduces motivation for training in the future.

When a client sets goals or has ambitions which are too high we call these fantasies. Physiotherapist and trainer can put goals into perspective, set realistic targets, and make the process enjoyable

Give yourself realistic timeframes to train

Having a goal is great because it drives you when times get tough during training, and it keeps you focussed through the training period. The time it takes for you to achieve your goal will vary depending on what that goal is. Sometimes I have seen people set goals with time frames which are too short.

When I completed my Ironman in Switzerland, I gave myself 1 year to prepare for the race. I worked with several coaches. Having 12 months gave me to time to learn and to get it right. I needed the time – because I was working – to fit in skill sessions, such as learning how to swim correctly, and to find the equipment I needed to race. I did get injured in the early stages of my training because my body was adapting to 6 days a week training. Having 12 months to train for the race allowed time for my body to recover from its injuries and to get back to full fitness to train again.

When the time to train before a race is too short there is greater risk of failure. I have had a client wanted to race the ‘Marathon de Sables’ in 2 years’ time, and to do an Ironman in 1 year’s time – and she had no background in endurance training; she also had an existing ankle injury. Setting goals like these is unrealistic; if you talk to a coach he will put a true time frame in for each event you want to complete. Personally I think it is better to leave more rather than less time to complete endurance events.

Remember, talk to your physiotherapist, coach or personal trainer when you want to set a new goal – to make your time frames realistic and to avoid injury at the same time.

Personal Training series: Physical Edge Physiotherapy team working specifically with Personal Trainers for superior results

I believe being healthy is important, as it affects every area of life – if you are healthy you can do more and feel better doing it. Often people find it difficult to motivate themselves to go to the gym or to do sport; they need someone to direct them in their training, give them focussed goals, and keep them motivated along the way. Personal trainers play a significant role in this regard – helping people achieve their physical goals. Today personal trainers often work in one-on-one training facilities, to offer functional gym training in a smaller more intimate environment;the gym generally has better equipment, is cleaner and the trainers can offer state of the art functional training.

Having spoken with several high profile trainers in London, we have identified the need for physiotherapists to work with trainers.People find it frustrating when they get injuries and the trainer sends them to a physiotherapist they do not know; the physiotherapist may not clearly communicate back to the trainer what the client’s injury is, and how to help heal that injury during training. Sometimes training is stopped for no reason and the client is taken away from his / her training goals.

The way to improve the training process is to have a physiotherapist work with the trainer from the very start. By getting assessed by a physiotherapist before training starts, a person can discuss their injuries and how their body operates with a medical professional. The physiotherapist will identify the injuries, past and present, which may present during training sessions; even if there are no current injuries, the physiotherapist can identify potential pitfalls a person may encounter as they go through their training regime towards their goals. Once the person is assessed by the physiotherapist the physio can feed back to the personal trainer what to look out for during the training process, what limitations there are for that person in training, and whether the training goal is appropriate. The trainer can then confidently train a client knowing that he/she is supported by a medical professional who understands injuries and how the body functions in response to them.

The personal trainer will continue to communicate closely with the physiotherapist during the training process; the physiotherapist will continue in their assessment of a client throughout their training regime in order to maintain correct movement of the body and further direct the trainer towards more advanced training goals. By working well together in this way the physiotherapist and trainer help to provide a better service to their clients. If an injury does occur during training the physiotherapist will already know the client, and the trainer will be able to communicate immediately with the physio on how to proceed. The synergy of this relationship far exceeds any personal training system by itself.

The benefits to the client are:

  • Prevention of injuries during training
  • Faster goal attainment
  • Faster return to training if an injury does occur.

If you are interested in working with a physiotherapist and personal trainer contact us at http://www.physical –edge.com

Newtotri: Introduction and making the decision start triathlon

ticles

 

Plan

 

  1. making the decision
  2. First steps to take
  3. What to expect with training
  4. Swim
  5. Bike
  6. Run

 

 

Introducing Rhys Chong and making the decision to enter your first triathlon

 

My name is Rhys, I am a physiotherapist  based in London and completed my first  Ironman in Switzerland last year. I have been asked by Newtotri to write weekly articles to help all of you who might want to do your first triathlon or are regularly enjoying this incredibly exciting sport.

 

I trained for one year to complete my Ironman.  When I started training I wanted learn the sport fast as there was no time to waste.  I managed to find several coaches to help me. These coaches included Ironman experts covering the areas of training, swimming, nutrition, mental preparation, bike mechanics, massage, and pilates.  I was able to take care of my injuries as a physiotherapist.

 

These coaches directed me in all aspects of Ironman training and saved me hours of work looking for information on places to train, equipment to buy and events to enter. I owed the success and enjoyment of my Ironman to these coaches.

 

I would like to share with you what I have learnt from these coaches and in my training. I hope I can enhance your triathlon training and race experience.

 

If you have never done a triathlon and are thinking about starting you might have loads of questions you want answered. It helps to read magazines, books and websites like Newtotri.. It also helps to talk to coaches because they can adapt their advice to your specific circumstances. There are many coaches in each discipline of triathlon. It is important to find coaches you enjoy talking to and trust. The best test is to meet them in person and then make sure their coaching is clear and easy to understand.

 

It makes a big difference to have coaches who have done what you want to do. The coaches will then appreciate what you will be going through and can offer practical solutions to help you.  If you do not connect with a coach find another one.

 

When I was making a decision to start in triathlon the greatest fear I had was the fear of the unknown.  These fears raised questions such as Could I do it? Was I able to fit it into my life? Who would help me? and where do I get the information I need? I spoke to lots of people but ultimately the decision was a step into the unknown. When you take the first step it is amazing how the rest will fall into place.  My advice is just get started, enter a race and take small steps in your training.

 

Training is a very personal experience. Every triathlete will find what works best for his or her body. Remember you get better the more you train and race and give yourself the time to learn. Making mistakes will happen but correcting these mistakes is when you learn the most.

 

Training with a triathlon club can introduce you to other triathletes and resources. I personally found working with coaches on a one on one basis and then training myself was better. Training in a group intruded on my own training outcomes. In a club the speed, distance and times of training were predetermined. I wanted to train when I had the time and at the speeds and distances suiting my training plan.  In a triathlon race you will be racing alone so it is better to train alone to get used to it.

 

Training alone has other advantages. I became more aware of my body and my equipment. I noticed my heart rate rise rapidly when I exercised hard and I was aware of how fast I recovered. I was more intune with my body’s reaction during training and as I learnt more I could adjust my race plan during the race depending on how I felt. This is very important in triathlon as you will be racing in three different sports one after the other and do not want to “hit the wall” and end your race prematurely.

 

In this article I have shared with you the benefits of having coaches to help you,  told you to enter your first triathlon even if you still have questions, and highlighted the benefit of training alone to  keep to your personal training goals.

 

You can find out more about my Triathlon Coaching Team on www.physical-edge.com Feel free to contact Physical Edge with your questions and read my blog on one year of Ironman training from my website.  Until next time, remember to stay focused and enjoy your new sport. You are now an athlete in currently the fastest growing Olympic sport in the world.