Recovery in Sport: First cold bath, increasing carbohydrates

This week was a different intensity of sport. I ran a 30 min fitness session, which was followed by drills and then 6 aside game. I went straight to tennis and had easy set of doubles and played single games for about 30minutes.

I ate two additional OTE carbohydrate bars immediately after football and just before tennis. I did not feel so hungry or tired. The football training was not as taxing this week, so this may have made a difference.

I drank Electrolyte during tennis and wore compression garments throughout all sport.

This week I read more on ice baths. The suggested time in the bath is 10 mins at 10-15 degrees. It has been raised that a cold bath may be just as effective.

This week I had a 10 min cold bath after sport. It was freezing getting in but after 3minutes my body adapted to the temperature and it felt nice. I could imagine putting ice in to keep it a little colder. My feet got slightly tingly towards the end of the bath. I actually over stayed in the bath by another 4-5 minutes. When I got out of the bath my legs felt cold, light and semi refreshed. I put my 2XU recovery leggings on until 11am the following morning. My legs felt slightly tired and tight because I played more tennis than normal. But, they did not feel heavy and cumbersome.

It was a good test doing the cold bath. I will try ice in the bath next time. I need to buy a thermometer to test the water temperature.

Our first game of the season is next weekend. In the team there are two injuries. A player strained his calf during training and another has low back pain after 45 minutes of football. I am treating them both and deciding how best to advise them on recovery. Ice baths maybe a good start after the match.

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Week 8: TZ1 and subtalar and midfoot joint motion

This week we covered the techniques to mobilise the subtalar joint and mid tarsal joint on the treatment table. These joints were mobilised by understanding how these joints connect and influence each other in weight bearing. These techniques were easy to use, and performed in as close to the normal hip and knee position as possible.

Using techniques on the treatment table fail to include the forces of gravity, ground reaction forces, mass and momentum when in weight bearing positions.  We can use environmental aids and in standing positons to best replicate normal funciton, and then mobilise the joints of the foot.

 

To be able to select the best position to place the body and then drive the body to get the desired chain reaction we can use TRAZMA analysis. In this analysis we look at what the bones are doing and what the relative joint motion will be. This is a key analysis to help confirm the correct drivers and body positions are used to get the desired chain reaction.

 

This week we covered balance and how we can mobilise the joints to get better stability with motion. There are many positions to use to test balance and they all involve movement, instead of standing still on one leg. 

 

We are one week away from Gift Gathering 1. There is a good build up of skill before the gathering. Time to test it out. 

GIFT week 5: Looking at AFS and the Calf complex

GIFT week 5 was a week of further development of what AFS represents and the progression of bone and joint motion to the function of the calf complex. 
 
This week there was a strong emphasis on what makes an AFS exercise an AFS exercise. Specific points were made on drivers,3D motion, unconscious chain reaction, path of least resistance, Authentic movement and uniqueness of environment. I can see each week these concepts are continually emphasised, in various ways, to embed them firmly in our minds. I can see these will create the framework from which we will diagnose, prescribe exercises and tweak exercises. The Litmus test has been described in the DVD series called Chain Reaction. These tests are those points described above.
 
In the webcasts this week the focus was on the calf complex. What it does and how it works econcentrically. The joint motion was described for the transformation zones of gait. The function of the calf muscles were described at the foot, ankle, and knee levels. It was refreshing to get a true functional understanding of the calf complex. It makes sense that muscle does not work in one plane of motion or is purely a concentric or eccentric muscle contraction. 
 
The webcasts further expanded on lunge matrices. This week it was description of how Lunge matrices can be used to enhance balance. The key point is balance needs to be trained dynamically and not statically. It can also be trained in 3 planes of motion. I think clients will enjoy how balance training can be so variable. 
 
Gift is about communication and this week we expanded our sign language learning to include letters  M to R. It is empowering to learn sign language and I hope by week 40 I will be able to sign simple expressions.
 
The learning this week has taken a step up, and is testing our knowledge, to make decisions on what is happening to joint motion with different tweaks and drivers. The knowledge builds.

GIFT training at the Gray Institute: week 4

Week 4 was a week of building on our understanding of what AFS is about and enhancing our understanding of 3 Dimensionality. AFS is more than 3D motion of the body. It is a look at the Mind, body, and spirit as 3D and the Physical, Biological and Behavioural sciences as 3D. When one dimension is changed it will change the other two dimensions. This concept is important when considering not only our own lives but the lives of those we treat e.g. If we alter the body of a client it will also influence the mind and spirit of that person.

This week wanted to build on the introduction to Nomenclature and also the biomechanics of bone and joint motion in the extremeties and the spine. A new concept called”Pivot” was explained and how it can be linked with lunge matrices.

The Foot was discussed in detail and how it functioned in gait. A key point is the Subtalar joint and how it operates as a torque converter i.e. converting frontal plane motion of the calcaneus into transverse plane motion up the chain.

A bit of fun was had with Gary doing a surfin joe talus to remind us of the free Talus and how it goes with the flow.

I think a key analysis skill I have learnt from the learning opportunity and learning about real and relative joint motion is, to look at the motion being performed, see the drivers and how they are influencing the bones of the joint, identify the speed and the direction the bones are moving and then describe the joint motion. I think seeing and feeling what is happening in any situation is realistic.

In the Matters that Matter documents GI highlighted the importance of spending time on what was important and not urgent. Also, true hospitality is when the host becomes the servant and the stranger becomes the guest.

Finally the Transcending truths create an umbrella over all other truths and they are the rule of 3D, everything is driven, every person is unique, create a chain reaction, encourage the transformation of others.

Physical Edge starts training with the Gray Institute

This blog will follow the Journey of Rhys Chong, from Physical Edge, through his 10 month training in GIFT, with Gary Gray and the Gray Institute. GIFT is a course designed to encourage the transformation of others, through unique environments, using drivers to create biomechanical chain reactions. The course will achieve faster and functional results in Physical Therapy.
 
There will be a weekly update for those clinicians or clients interested in following the journey.
 
Week 0-3
 
In the first three weeks of GIFT we were introduced to the concept of Principles, Strategies and Techniques. There was an emphasis on the Scientific truths from Physical Sciences, Biological Sciences and Behavioural Sciences. From these Principles (Truths), Strategies were formed and then Techniques created. 
 
GIFT involved an understanding of the Mind, Body and Spirit. When one was altered, the other two would also be altered. This 3 Dimensional relationship was taken into treatment to create an encouraging transformational environment.
 
We were shown Lunge Matrices (logical 3D sequencing of movements) which opened up the possibility of assessing two sides of the body at once in a weight bearing position. To understand what to was happening at each joint in the body we were taught about bone motion and relative joint motion. 
 
There were some European clinicians on the course, but mainly American clinicians. The team at the Gray Institute pride themselves on giving the best possible course and service. They are all very approachable and easily contacted. They respond to emails quickly. 
 
The training is on webcasts with three trips to the USA to study. The webcasts had issues initially, but now a working with Vimeo.
So far the training is excellent and I look forward to the weekly training which starts each Thursday of the week.

 

Summary of 17 most common injuries related to training in the gym

This series of blogs has been designed to give you information about the 17 most common issues related to training in a gym. Each blog discusses what is commonly seen by trainers and physiotherapists when people train in the gym – and also the importance of having a trainer and physiotherapist working closely together to create a training plan to prevent injury and maximise results.

The synergy of a physiotherapist and trainer working together has huge benefits in terms of continuity of care, injury prevention, and communication between all clinicians and you – the person trying to achieve the goal.

When a physiotherapist and trainer work together injuries can be prevented by early assessment to identify problems which may occur in the training process. The key principle here is prevention of injury rather than healing of injury once it has occurred. The physiotherapist is valuable in his / her knowledge of medicine and musculoskeletal injury, and the trainer is valuable in setting training goals and making sure you are motivated and carry through with your plan.

If you are interested in working with a physiotherapist and a trainer who have spent years refining the process of injury prevention contact us as at mail@physical-edge.com now.