Making common sense training goals

Many of us like to set goals which will push us to our limits.  If we want to learn something well, we usually have a teacher or a coach, and this applies to physical training as well.

If you set a goal and along the way you get injured, or you can see that your sport is unsafe because your body cannot cope with the loads exerted on it, then have the common sense to change. The ability to listen to your body can prevent acute and long -term injuries. It is not worth training for weeks or months, to get injured and see your goals slip away.

A physiotherapist and trainer can help you make common sense decisions about your training goals. Both clinicians will listen to what you want to achieve, and assess your body, to decide whether or not your goals are realistic. Choosing the appropriate training goals will make training safe and achievable.

The body is not a machine, it responds to physical stimulus and will adapt over time. Setting goals which are small, on which you can build towards a much bigger goal, is the best way to train. A physiotherapist has knowledge in the areas of pathology, physiology and neurophysiology. A trainer knows how to train to achieve physical goals. Working with a Physiotherapist and Trainer gives you the professional support to choose the training program to best suit your needs.

Make a common sense decision now, before you waste time and money, and suffer injuries. Consult your physiotherapist and trainer as they work with you as you achieve your training goals.

Advertisements

Ironman and Author Rhys Chong is interviewed by The Running Bug and talks about working with a professional Team to achieve his goals

Author, Physiotherapist and Ironman, Rhys Chong describes how he completed an ironman using his own team of professionals. Whether it’s 5k or an ironman you can boost your chances of success by training like an elite.

ironmanWinning a Gold Medal at the Olympics, winning the Tour de France or winning an Ironman are spared for the elite athletes of the world. Every sport has its unique demands, but there is one goal all athletes strive for … to be the “best he/she can be”.

Whether you are a professional or an amateur, there are aspects of trainingwhich can help you be the “best you can be”. The key is to have a team of specialists who work specifically for you. Bradley Wiggins, Chrissie Wellington, and Sir Chris Hoy all have a team of professionals guiding them to success.

I completed my Ironman and had a team of professionals working with me. I knew if I wanted to be the “best I could be” I would need coaches for different parts of my training. In my team there was a training coach, swim coach, bike mechanic,nutritionistmental conditioning coach, massage therapist, physiotherapist, and pilates instructor.

Each member of my coaching team had their role to play at various stages in my year of preparation for the Ironman. My training coach directed the overall training plan and as my strength and technique improved, with the help of other specialists, I focussed on work with my mental conditioning coach. I did have injuries during the year but they were minor. It helped to condition my body with gym work and pilates. The expert physiotherapy treatment and massage therapy I received allowed me to train six days a week.

Elite athletes will train in cycles of four years in preparation for the Olympics. The focus of their team is to have them at peak performance for that one race, on that one day that really counts. This could be your “A” race for the year when you want to set a PB (Personal Best).

My advice is to plan your training with your coaches. Your entire physical and mental preparation will be for your “A” race. The synergy created by pinpoint focus on your “A” race will create incredible results.

There are multiple benefits to having a team of coaches. Your coaches are with you from the beginning of your journey through to crossing the finish line. They know how you “tick”, and can provide you with emotional guidance and motivation, in the good times and the bad. Your training can be adapted to fit with what is happening in your life. When it really matters, we all want to talk to people and training is no different.

 

Tri Coaches to try:

www.physical-edge.com.

Rhys Chong talks about a winning team for success in sport and life

Winning a Gold Medal at the Olympics, winning the Tour de France or winning an Ironman are spared for the elite athletes of the world. Every sport has its unique demands but there is one goal all athletes strive for … to be the “best he/she can be”.

Whether you are a professional or an amateur there are aspects of training which can help you be the “best you can be”. The key is to have a team of specialists who work specifically for you. Bradley Wiggins, Chrissie Wellington, and Sir Chris Hoy all have a team of professionals guiding them to success.

 I completed my Ironman and had a team of professionals working with me. I knew if I wanted to be the “best I could be” I would need coaches for different parts of my training. In my team was a training coach, swim coach, bike mechanic, nutritionist, mental conditioning coach, massage therapist, physiotherapist, and pilates instructor.

 Each member of my coaching team had their role to play at various stages in my year of preparation for the Ironman. My training coach directed the overall training plan and as my strength and technique improved, with the help of other specialists, I focussed on work with my mental conditioning coach. I did have injuries during the year but they were minor. It helped to condition my body with gym work and pilates. The expert physiotherapy treatment and massage therapy I received allowed me to train 6 days a week.

 Elite athletes will train in cycles of 4 years in preparation for the Olympics. The focus of their team is to have them at peak performance for that one race on that one day that really counts. This could be your “A” race for the year when you want to set a PB (Personal Best time). 

 My advice is to plan your training with your coaches. Your entire physical and mental preparation will be for your “A” race. The synergy created by pinpoint focus on your “A” race will create incredible results. 

The benefits of having a team of coaches are far greater, when compared with a computer or book prescribed program. Your coaches are with you from the beginning of your journey through to crossing the finish line. They know how you “tick”, and can provide you with emotional guidance and motivation, in the good times and the bad. Your training can be adapted to fit with what is happening in your life. When it really matters we all want to talk to people and training is no different.

If you want to race an Ironman for the first time and want the right team of coaches to work with, see  www.physical-edge.com   

Rhys Chong

Author, Physiotherapist and Ironman

First professional swim coaching session with Emile. www.physical-edge.com

Emile and I assessed the video taken last week. The video showed above and below the water. From the top of the water we could see I needed slightly more shoulder rotation, the head was staying nice and low, and I had smooth and non splash entry of the hand, and good glide of the arms. From under the water my body was bowing in the middle as I breathed and the the legs were sticking out to the side with the knee flexed and this was creating drag. My feet were apart when kicking and I had minimal kicking. I was overcoming the drag with my arms. My fingers were seperating as I was pushing through the water past my hip. This was losing forward momentum and apparently due to weak tricep muscles. I had good pull through motion with my arms although I was not internally rotating my arm and flexing my elbow soon enough and losing some valuable pull through the water with my arms.

We went through three drills today and the keys points from each of them were;

1. Kicking from the hips and use my glute muslces, keep my toes together so that when I kick my big toes brush against one another,  Keep the distance I kick within the width of my body and kick with a shorter motion. Kicking with a shorter motion may look like I am kicking faster but it s energy efficient. The key here is also to let my knees slightly relax so that on the downward phase of the leg my quads contract briefly to pull the leg down in the water and then they relax and the bouyancy of the water allows the leg to straighten again. I only use my muscles in one phase of the kick and it is energy efficient. Generally I am a slow mover so I must practice kicking with a shorter motion within the width of my body.

2. Superman drill: I am to have my arm out in front and my head looking straight and snug against the shoulder. The opposite arm is held against my body and I kick in a side position in the water. This is to practice the main position I am in when I swim. I am using a buoy in my hand as I have more muscle mass than fat and I sink in the water. This allows me to breath between strokes. The kicking is what keeps me a float and again I found kicking with a shorter motion was important. I also had to use my core stability to keep my body above the water. It was difficult to keep my head looking straight. The purpose of the heaad straight is to replicate the head position I want to be in when I swim. It was important for me to relax, focus on the kick and core stability.

3. Swimming on my back and rotating my shoulders side to side  so that my trunk and pelvis rotate on my head. This is to practice getting correct head and body rotation as I swim. Initially my would sink as I turned my shoulders. Apparently I should turn slower to allow the water to adjust to the new body positon I am in and also to keep kicking and eventually I would come up and out of the water.

These are three drills I am to practice and when I am ready I am to see Emile again. I will be getting a copy of the videos and posting them on my youtube site at www.physical-edge.com

I am not sure how long I should wait for the next one. I am thinking it is better to have them sooner than later to allow me to practice good habits. I will find out the closest pool to me and then diarise my swim sessions. I think training with Emile each Saturday is a good plan.