Personal training series: Risk of long term injuries

 

Injuries can occur in several degrees of severity. Some injuries can be niggles which ease with time; some of these niggles continue to plague a person throughout their life. Severe injuries may require hospitalisation or immobilisation and rehabilitation; other sever injuries will handicap a person for life. There is a spectrum of minor to severe injuries, and each person’s injury sits somewhere along this line.

Why can’t you get rid of these injuries? When you get assessed by a physiotherapist the physiotherapist will tell you what the injury is and what needs to be done to heal that injury. I see the best results when the client follows the physiotherapists instructions and does their homework. Failed treatment usually results when a client comes to physiotherapy under the illusion that treatment for 30 mins twice a week will take away their pain without their having to make lifestyle choices to stop aggravating their injury.

When injuries are neglected during daily life and in training they become more deeply set in within the body. Pain can be remembered by the body through the nervous system. The nervous system is said to be ‘sensitised’ and will hence react to normal movement in an abnormal way. A person can live their life in pain even though the actual initial injury is healed.

Some injuries do require surgical intervention or help from various medical professionals. More than this, however, change in mental attitude is required about a client’s injuries. Sometimes injuries which have been present for a long time will continue to cause pain and it is about managing that pain through a different mindset.

Injuries should not prevent training; what prevents training is what decisions a person makes about what they are committed to do in their training and at home. Failure in physiotherapy and training should not be blamed on the clinicians; clients should look within to see the degree to which they are contributing themselves to the pain that they suffer. Physiotherapy requires input from the client just as much as the physiotherapist has his own input on the client.

It is clear that those clients who are most successful in physiotherapy are those prepared to make changes in their life. It is not easy to assess what changes you need in your life and that is where a physiotherapist and trainer can help you with their vast experience with other clients and their training. A physiotherapist and trainer can also monitor a client’s progress; help with maintenance of his good health; and inspire him to achieve goals that he never thought were possible.

My advice is that if you want to start training to help long term injuries, you would benefit from the input of a physiotherapist and personal trainer working closely together with your interests at heart.

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